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King James Dictionary

414 terms and definitions for "A"

  • A

    A is the first letter of the Alphabet in most of the known languages of the earth in the Ethiopic, however it is the thirteenth, and in the Runic the tenth. It is naturally the first letter, because ...

  • Abaddon

    ABAD'DON, n. Heb. Ch. Syr. Sam. to be lost, or destroyed, to perish. 1. The destroyer, or angel of the bottomless pit. Revelation 9 2. The bottomless pit....

  • Abase

    ABA'SE, Fr abaisser, from bas, low, or the bottom W. bais Latin and Gr. basis Eng. base It. Abbassare Sp. bare, low. See Abash. 1. The literal sense of abase is to lower or depress, to throw ...

  • Abased

    ABA'SED, pp. Reduced to a low state, humbled, degraded. In heraldry, it is used of the wings of eagles, when the tops are turned downwards towards the point of the shield or when the wings are shu...

  • Abash

    ABASH', Heb. and Ch. bosh, to be confounded, or ashamed. To make the spirits to fall to cast down the countenance to make ashamed to confuse or confound, as by exciting suddenly a consciousness ...

  • Abasing

    ABA'SING, ppr. Humbling, depressing, bringing low. ...

  • Abate

    ABA'TE, Heb. Ch., to beat. The Saxon has the participle gebatod, abated. The prefix is sunk to a in abate, and lost in beat. See Class Bd. No. 23,33. 1. To beat down to pull down to destroy in...

  • Abated

    ABA'TED, pp. Lessened decreased destroyed mitigated defeated remitted overthrown. ...

  • Abba

    AB'BA, n. In the Chaldee and Syriac, a father, and figuratively a superior. appen. In the Syriac, Coptic and Ethiopic churches, it is a title given to the Bishops, and the Bishops bestow the title...

  • Abhor

    ABHOR', L abhorreo, of ab and horreo, to set up bristles, shiver or shake to look terrible. 1. To hate extremely, or with contempt to lothe, detest or abominate. 2. To despise or neglect. P...

  • Abhorred

    ABHOR'RED, pp. Hated extremely, detested. ...

  • Abhorring

    ABHOR'RING, ppr. Having great aversion, detesting. As a noun, it is used in Isaiah 66for the object of hatred - "An abhorring to all flesh." ...

  • Abib

    A'BIB, n. Heb. swelling, protuberant. To produce the first or early fruit a full grown ear of corn. The first month of the Jewish ecclesiastical year, called also Nisan. It begins at the spring e...

  • Abide

    ABI'DE, 5:1:pert. and part. abode. abada, to be, or exist, to continue W. bod, to be to dwell, rest, continue, stand firm, or be stationary for anytime indefinitely. Class Bd. No 7. 1. To rest...

  • Abiding

    ABI'DING, ppr. Dwelling remaining continuing enduring awaiting. ABI'DING, n. Continuance fixed state residence an enduring. ...

  • Ability

    ABIL'ITY, n. L. habilitas, ableness, fitness, from habeo, to have or hold. 1. Physical power, whether bodily or mental natural or acquired force of understanding skill in arts or science. Abil...

  • Abject

    ABJECT', To throw away to cast out. Obs. ...

  • Able

    ABLE, a. a'bl. L. habitis 1. Having physical power sufficient having competent power or strength, bodily or mental as a man able to perform military service - a child is not able to reason on ab...

  • Aboard

    ABOARD, adv. a and board. See Board. Within a ship, vessel, or boat. To go aboard, to enter a ship, to embark. To fall aboard, to strike a ship's side. Aboard main tack, an order to draw a co...

  • Abode

    ABO'DE, pret. of abide ABO'DE, n. See Abide. 1. Stay continuance in a place residence for a longer or shorter time. 2. A place of continuance a dwelling a habitation. 3. To make abode...

  • Abolish

    ABOL'ISH, L. abolco from ab and oleo, olesco, to grow. 1. To make void to annul to abrogate applied chiefly and appropriately to established laws, contracts, rites, customs and institutions - ...

  • Abolished

    ABOL'ISHED, pp. annulled repealed abrogated, or destroyed. ...

  • Abominable

    ABOM'INABLE, a. See Abominate. 1. Very hateful detestable lothesome. 2. This word is applicable to whatever is odious to the mind or offensive to the senses. 3. Unclean. Leviticus 7:18...

  • Abominably

    ABOM'INABLY, adv. 1. Very odiously detestably sinfully. 1 Kings 21 2. In vulgar language, extremely, excessively....

  • Abominate

    ABOM'INATE, L. abomino, supposed to be formed by ab and omen to deprecate as ominous may the Gods avert the evil. To hate extremely to abhor to detest...

  • Abomination

    ABOMINA'TION, n. 1. Extreme hatred detestation. 2. The object of detestation, a common signification in scripture. The way of the wicked is an abomination to the Lord. Proverbs 15 3. Hen...

  • Abortive

    ABOR'TIVE, a. 1. Brought forth in an immature state failing, or coming to naught, before it is complete. 2. Failing in its effect miscarrying producing nothing as an abortive scheme. 3. R...

  • Abound

    ABOUND', 5:1 L. abundo. If this word is from L. unda, a wave, the latter has probably lost its first consonant. Abound may naturally be deduced from the Celtic. L. fons, a fountain. 1. To have ...

  • Abounding

    ABOUND'ING, ppr. Having in great plenty being in great plenty, being very prevalent generally prevailing. ABOUND'ING, n. Increase. ...

  • About

    ABOUT', prep. Gr. butan, without, see but, literally, around, on the outside. 1. Around on the exterior part or surface. Bind them about thy neck. Proverbs 3:3. Isaiah 50 Hence, 2. Near t...

  • Above

    ABOVE', prep. 1. Literally, higher in place. The fowls that fly above the earth. Genesis 1:20. 2. Figuratively, superior in any respect. I saw a light above the brightness of the Sun, Act...

  • Abroad

    ABROAD, adv. abrawd'. See Broad In a general sense, at large widely not confined to narrow limits. Hence, 1. In the open air. 2. Beyond or out of the walls of a house, as to walk abroad. ...

  • Absence

    AB'SENCE, n. L. absens, from absum, abesse, to be away ab and sum. 1. A state of being at a distance in place, or not in company. It is used to denote any distance indefinitely, either in the sa...

  • Absent

    AB'SENT, a. 1. Not present not in company at such a distance as to prevent communication. It is used also for being in a foreign country. A gentleman is absent on his travels. Absent from on...

  • Abstain

    ABSTA'IN, L. abstineo, to keep from abs and teneo, to hold. See Tenant. In a general sense, to forbear, or refrain from, voluntarily but used chiefly to denote a restraint upon the passions or ...

  • Abstinence

    AB'STINENCE, n. L. abstinentia. See Abstain. 1. In general, the act or practice of voluntarily refraining from, or forbearing any action. "Abstinence from every thing which can be deemed labor. ...

  • Absurd

    ABSURD', a. L. absurdus, from ab and surdus, deaf, insensible. Opposed to manifest truth inconsistent with reason or the plain dictates of common sense. An absurd man acts contrary to the clear di...

  • Abundance

    ABUND'ANCE, n. Great plenty an overflowing quantity ample sufficiency in strictness applicable to quantity only but customarily used of number, as an abundance of peasants. In scripture, the ab...

  • Abundant

    ABUND'ANT, a. Plentiful in great quantity fully sufficient as an abundant supply. In scripture, abounding having in great quantity overflowing with. The Lord God is abundant in goodness and t...

  • Abundantly

    ABUND'ANTLY, adv. Fully amply plentifully in a sufficient degree. ...

  • Abuse

    ABU'SE, s as z. L. abutor, abusus of ab and utor, to use Gr. to accustom. See Use. 1. To use : to maltreat to misuse to use with bad motives or to wrong purposes as, to abuse rights or priv...

  • Abused

    ABU'SED, pp. s as z. Ill-used used to a bad purpose treated with rude language misemployed perverted to bad or wrong ends deceived defiled violated. ...

  • Abusing

    ABU'SING, ppr. s as z. Using : employing to bad purposes deceiving violating the person perverting. ...

  • Abut

    ABUT', To border upon to be contiguous to to meet in strictness, to adjoin to at the end but this distinction has not always been observed. The word is chiefly used in describing the bounds or s...

  • Accede

    ACCE'DE, L. accedo, of ad and cedo, to yield or give place, or rather to move. 1. To agree or assent, as to a proposition, or to terms proposed by another. Hence in a negotiation. 2. To becom...

  • Accept

    ACCEPT', L. accepto, from accipio, ad and capio, to take. 1. To take or receive what is offered, with a consenting mind to receive with approbation or favor. Bless, Lord, his substance, and acc...

  • Acceptable

    ACCEPT'ABLE, a. 1. That may be received with pleasure hence pleasing to a receiver gratifying as an acceptable present. 2. Agreeable or pleasing in person as, a man makes himself acceptable ...

  • Acceptably

    ACCEPT'ABLY, adv. In a manner to please, or give satisfaction. Let us have grace whereby we may serve God acceptably. Hebrews 12 ....

  • Acceptance

    ACCEPT'ANCE, n. 1. A receiving with approbation or satisfaction favorable reception as work done to acceptance. They shall come up with acceptance on my altar. Isaiah 60 . 2. the receivin...

  • Acceptation

    ACCEPTA'TION, n. 1. Kind reception a receiving with favor or approbation. This is a saying worthy of all acceptation. 1 Timothy 1 . 2. A state of being acceptable favorable regard. Some...

  • Accepted

    ACCEPT'ED, pp. Kindly received regarded agreed to understood received as a bill of exchange. ...

  • Accepting

    ACCEPT'ING, ppr. Receiving favorably agreeing to understanding. ...

  • Access

    ACCESS', n. L. accessus, from accedo. See Accede. 1. A coming to near approach admittance admission, as to gain access to a prince. 2. Approach, or the way by which a thing may be approache...

  • Accompanied

    ACCOM'PANIED, pp. Attended joined with in society. ...

  • Accompany

    ACCOM'PANY, See Company. 1. To go with or attend as a companion or associate on a journey, walk, &c as a man accompanies his friend to church, or on a tour. 2. To be with as connected to atte...

  • Accompanying

    ACCOM'PANYING, ppr. Attending going with as a companion. ...

  • Accomplish

    ACCOM'PLISH, L. compleo, to complete. See Complete. 1. To complete to finish entirely. That He would accomplish seventy years in the desolation of Jerusalem. Daniel 9 2. To execute as ...

  • Accomplished

    ACCOM'PLISHED, pp. 1. Finished completed fulfilled executed effected. 2. a. Well endowed with good qualities and manners complete in acquirements having a finished education. 3. Fashio...

  • Accomplishing

    ACCOM'PLISHING, ppr. finishing completing fulfilling executing effecting furnishing with valuable qualities. ...

  • Accomplishment

    ACCOM'PLISHMENT, n. 1. Completion fulfillment entire performance as the accomplishment of a prophecy. 2. The act of carrying into effect, or obtaining an object designed attainment as the a...

  • Accord

    ACCORD', n.The Lat. has concors, concordo. 1. Agreement harmony of minds consent or concurrence of opinions or wills. They all continued with one accord in prayer. Acts 1:14. 2. Concert h...

  • According

    ACCORD'ING, ppr. 1. Agreeing harmonizing. Th' according music of a well mixt state. 2. Suitable agreeable in accordance with. In these senses, the word agrees with or refers to a sentence...

  • Accordingly

    ACCORD'INGLY, adv. Agreeably suitably in a manner conformable to. Those who live in faith and good works, will be rewarded accordingly. ...

  • Account

    ACCOUNT', n. 1. A sum stated on paper a registry of a debt or credit of debts and credits, or charges an entry in a book or on paper of things bought or sold, of payments, services &c., includi...

  • Accounted

    ACCOUNT'ED, pp. Esteemed deemed considered regarded valued. Accounted for, explained. ...

  • Accounting

    ACCOUNT'ING, ppr. Deeming esteeming reckoning rendering an account. Accounting for, rendering an account assigning the reasons unfolding the causes. ACCOUNT'ING, n. The act of reckoning or ...

  • Accursed

    ACCURS'ED, pp. or a. 1. Doomed to destruction or misery: The city shall be accursed. John 6 . 2. Separated from the faithful cast out of the church excommunicated. I could wish myself a...

  • Accusation

    ACCUSA'TION, n. 1. The act of charging with a crime or offense the act of accusing of any wrong or injustice. 2. The charge of an offense or crime or the declaration containing the charge. T...

  • Accuse

    ACCU'SE, L. accuso, to blame or accuse ad and causor, to blame, or accuse causa, blame, suit, or process, cause. See Cause. 1. To charge with, or declare to have committed a crime, either by pl...

  • Accused

    ACCU'SED, pp. Charged with a crime, by a legal process charged with an offense blamed. ...

  • Accuser

    ACCU'SER, n. One who accuses or blames an officer who prefers an accusation against another for some offense, in the name of the government, before a tribunal that has cognizance of the offense. ...

  • Accusing

    ACCU'SING, ppr. Charging with a crime blaming. ...

  • Accustom

    ACCUS'TOM, To make familiar by use to form a habit by practice to habituate or inure as to accustom one's self to a spare diet. ACCUS'TOM, 1. To be wont, or habituated to do anything. Littl...

  • Accustomed

    ACCUS'TOMED, pp. 1. Being familiar by use habituated inured. 2. a. Usual often practiced as in their accustomed manner....

  • Aceldama

    ACEL'DAMA, n. A field said to have laid south of Jerusalem, the same as the potters field, purchased with the bribe which Judas took for betraying his master, and therefore called the field of bloo...

  • Achor

    A'CHOR, n. Gr., sordes capitis. 1. The scald head, a disease forming scaly eruptions, supposed to be a critical evacuation of acrimonious humors a species of herpes. 2. In mythology, the God o...

  • Acknowledge

    ACKNOWL'EDGE, Aknol'edge, ad and knowledge. See Know. 1. To own, avow or admit to be true, by a declaration of assent as to acknowledge the being of a God. 2. To own or notice with particular...

  • Acknowledged

    ACKNOWL'EDGED, pp. Owned confessed noticed with regard or gratitude received with approbation owned before authority. ...

  • Acknowledging

    ACKNOWL'EDGING, ppr. Owning confessing approving grateful but the latter sense is a gallicism, not to be used. ...

  • Acquaint

    ACQUA'INT, Eng. can, and ken which see. 1. To make known to make fully or intimately known to make familiar. A man of sorrows and acquainted with grief. Isaiah 53 . 2. To inform to com...

  • Acquaintance

    ACQUAI'NTANCE, n. 1. Familiar knowledge a state of being acquainted, or of having intimate or more than slight or superficial knowledge as, I know the man, but have no acquaintance with him. Som...

  • Acquainted

    ACQUA'INTED, pp. Known familiarly known informed having personal knowledge. ...

  • Acquainting

    ACQUA'INTING, ppr. Making known to giving notice, or information to. ...

  • Acquired

    ACQUI'RED, pp. Gained, obtained, or received from art, labor, or other means, in distinction from those things which are bestowed by nature. Thus we say, abilities, natural and acquired. It implies...

  • Acquit

    ACQUIT', L. cedo. To set free to release or discharge from an obligation, accusation, guilt, censure, suspicion, or whatever lies upon a person as a charge or duty as, the jury acquitted the pris...

  • Acre

    ACRE, n. a'ker. Gr Lat. ager. In these languages, the word retains its primitive sense, an open, plowed, or sowed field. In Eng. it retained its original signification, that of any open field, unt...

  • Act

    ACT, Gr., Lat. to urge, drive, lead, bring, do, perform, or in general to move, to exert force. 1. To exert power as, the stomach acts upon food the will acts upon the body in producing motion. ...

  • Activity

    ACTIV'ITY, n. The quality of being active the active faculty nimbleness agility also the habit of diligent and vigorous pursuit of business as, a man of activity. It is applied to persons or th...

  • Adam

    AD'AM, n. In Heb., Man primarily, the name of the human species, mankind appropriately, the first Man, the progenitor of the human race. The word signifies form, shape, or suitable form, hence, sp...

  • Adamant

    AD'AMANT, n. Gr. L. adamas a word of Celtic origin. A very hard or impenetrable stone a name given to the diamond and other substances of extreme hardness. The name has often been given to the...

  • Adar

    A'DAR, n. a Hebrew month, answering to the latter part of February, and the beginning of March, the 12th of the sacred and 6th of the year so named to become glorious, from the exuberance of vegetat...

  • Add

    ADD, L. addo, from ad and do, to give. 1. To set or put together, join or unite, as one thing or sum to another, in an agreegate as, add three to four, the sum is seven. 2. To unite in idea or...

  • Added

    ADD'ED, pp. Joined in place, in sum, in mass or aggregate, in number, in idea or consideration united put together. ...

  • Adder

    AD'DER, n. L. natrix, a serpent. A venomous serpent or viper, of several species. ...

  • Addicted

    ADDICT'ED, pp. Devoted by customary practice. ...

  • Adding

    ADD'ING, ppr. Joining putting together increasing. ...

  • Addition

    ADDI'TION, n. L. additio, from addo. 1. The act of adding, opposed to subtraction, or diminution as, a sum is increased by addition. 2. Any thing added, whether material or immaterial. 3. I...

  • Adjure

    ADJU'RE, L. adjuro, to sweat solemnly, or compel one to swear from ad and juro, to swear. 1. To charge, bind or command on oath, or under the penalty of a curse. Joshua adjured them at that tim...

  • Adjured

    ADJU'RED, pp. Charged on oath, or with a denunciation of God's wrath solemnly urged. ...

  • Administered

    ADMIN'ISTERED, pp. Executed managed governed afforded given dispensed. ...

  • Administration

    ADMINISTRA'TION, n. 1. The act of administering direction management government of public affairs the conducting of any office or employment. 2. The executive part of government, consisting ...

  • Admiration

    ADMIRA'TION, n. Wonder mingled with pleasing emotions, as approbation, esteem, love or veneration a compound emotion excited by something novel, rare, great, or excellent applied to persons and the...

  • Admired

    ADMI'RED, pp. Regarded with wonder, mingled with pleasurable sensations, as esteem, love or reverence. ...

  • Admit

    ADMIT', L. admitto, from ad and mitto, to send. 1. To suffer to enter to grant entrance whether into a place, or an office, or into the mind, or consideration as to admit a student into colleg...

  • Admonish

    ADMON'ISH, L. admoneo, ad and moneo, to teach, warn, admonish. 1. To warn or notify of a fault to reprove with mildness. Count him not as an enemy, but admonish him as a brother. 2 Thessalon...

  • Admonished

    ADMON'ISHED, pp. Reproved advised warned instructed. ...

  • Admonishing

    ADMON'ISHING, ppr. Reproving warning counseling directing. ...

  • Admonition

    ADMONI'TION, n. Gentle reproof counseling against a fault instruction in duties caution direction. Titus 3 . 1 Corinthians 10 . In church discipline, public or private reproof to reclaim a...

  • Ado

    ADO', n. Bustle trouble labor difficulty as, to make a great ado about trifles to persuade one with much ado. ...

  • Adoption

    ADOP'TION, n. L. adoptio. 1. The act of adopting, or the state of being adopted the taking and treating of a stranger as one's own child. 2. The receiving as one's own, what is new or not natu...

  • Adorn

    ADORN', L. adorno, ad and orno, to deck, or beautify, to dress, set off, extol, furnish. 1. To deck or decorate to make beautiful to add to beauty by dress to deck with external ornaments. A b...

  • Adorned

    ADORN'ED, pp. Decked decorated embellished. ...

  • Adorning

    ADORN'ING, ppr. Ornamenting decorating displaying beauty. ADORN'ING, n. Ornament decoration. 1 Peter 3 . ...

  • Adulterate

    ADUL'TERATE, L. adultero, from adulter, mixed, or an adulterer ad and alter, other. To corrupt, debase, or make impure by an admixture of baser materials as, to adulterate liquors, or the coin of...

  • Adulterer

    ADUL'TERER, n. L. adulter. 1. A man guilty of adultery a man who has sexual commerce with any married woman, except his wife. See Adultery. 2. In scripture, an idolator. Ezekiel 23 . 3. ...

  • Adulteress

    ADUL'TERESS, n. A married woman guilty of incontinence. ...

  • Adulterous

    ADUL'TEROUS, a. 1. Guilty of adultery pertaining to adultery. 2. In scripture, idolatrous, very wicked. Matthew 12,16 . Mark 8....

  • Adultery

    ADUL'TERY, n. L. adulterium. See Adulterate. 1. Violation of the marriage bed a crime, or a injury, which introduces, or may introduce, into a family, a spurious offspring. By the laws of Conn...

  • Advanced

    ADV'ANCED, pp. Moved forward promoted improved furnished beforehand situated in front, or before the rest also old, having reached the decline of life as, advanced in years an advanced age. ...

  • Advantage

    ADV'ANTAGE, n. 1. Any state, condition, or circumstance, favorable to success, prosperity, interest, or reputation. The enemy had the advantage of elevated ground. 2. Benefit gain profit. ...

  • Advantaged

    ADV'ANTAGED, pp. Benefitted promoted. ...

  • Advent

    AD'VENT, n. L. adventus, from advenio, of ad and venio, to come. See Find. A coming appropriately the coming of our Savior, and in the calendar, it includes four sabbaths before Christmas, beginn...

  • Adventure

    ADVENT'URE, n. See Advent. 1. Hazard risk chance that of which one has no direction as, at all adventures, that is, at all hazards. See Venture. 2. An enterprize of hazard a bold underta...

  • Adventured

    ADVENT'URED, pp. Put to hazard ventured risked. ...

  • Adversary

    AD'VERSARY, n. See Adverse. 1. An enemy or foe one who has enmity at heart. The Lord shall take vengeance on his adversaries. Nahum 1 . In scripture, Satan is called THE adversary, by way ...

  • Adverse

    AD'VERSE, a. L. adversus, opposite of ad and versus, turned from verto, to turn. See Advert. This word was formerly accented, by some authors, on the last syllable but the accent is now settled ...

  • Adversity

    ADVERS'ITY, n. An event, or series of events, which oppose success or desire misfortune calamity affliction distress state of unhappiness. In the day of adversity, consider. Ecclesiastes 7 ...

  • Advert

    ADVERT', L. adverto, of ad and verto, to turn. To turn the mind or attention to to regard, observe, or notice: with to as, he adverted to what was said, or to a circumstance that occurred. ...

  • Advertise

    ADVERTI'SE, s as z. See Advert. 1. To inform to give notice, advice or intelligence to, whether of a past or present event, or of something future. I will advertise thee what this people will ...

  • Advice

    ADVI'CE, n. L. viso, to see, to visit. 1. Counsel an opinion recommended, or offered, as worthy to be followed. What advice give ye? 2 Chronicles 10 . With good advice make war. Proverb...

  • Advise

    ADVI'SE, s as z. See Advice. 1. To give counsel to to offer an opinion, as worthy or expedient to be followed as, I advise you to be cautious of speculation. 2. To give information to commu...

  • Advised

    ADVI'SED, pp. 1. Informed counseled also cautious prudent acting with deliberation. Let him be advised in his answers. With the well advised is wisdom. Proverbs 13 . 2. Done, formed, ...

  • Advisement

    ADVI'SEMENT, n. 1. Counsel information circumspection. 2. Consultation. The action standing continued nisi for advisement....

  • Advocate

    AD'VOCATE, n. L. advocatus, from advoco, to call for, to plead for of ad and voco, to call. See Vocal. 1. Advocate, in its primary sense, signifies, one who pleads the cause of another in a cour...

  • Afar

    AF'AR, adv. a and far. See Far. 1. At a distance in place to or from a distance used with from preceding, or off following as, he was seen from afar I saw him afar off. 2. In scripture, fi...

  • Affect

    AFFECT', L. afficio, affectum, of ad and facio, to make affecto, to desire, from the same room. Affect is to make to, or upon to press upon. 1. To act upon to produce an effect or change upon ...

  • Affected

    AFFECT'ED, pp. 1. Impressed moved, or touched, either in person or in interest having suffered some change by external force, loss, danger, and the like as, we are more or less affected by the f...

  • Affection

    AFFEC'TION, n. 1. The state of being affected. Little used. 2. Passion but more generally, 3. A bent of mind towards a particular object, holding a middle place between disposition, which i...

  • Affectionately

    AFFEC'TIONATELY, adv. With affection fondly tenderly kindly. 1 Thessalonians 2 . ...

  • Affectioned

    AFFEC'TIONED, a. 1. Disposed having an affection of heart. Be ye kindly affectioned one to another. Romans 12 . 2. Affected conceited. Obs....

  • Affinity

    AFFIN'ITY, n. L. affinitas, from affinis, adjacent, related by marriage ad and finis, end. 1. The relation contracted by marriage, between a husband and his wife's kindred, and between a wife and...

  • Affirm

    AFFIRM, afferm' L. affirmo ad and firmo, to make firm. See Firm. 1. To assert positively to tell with confidence to aver to declare the existence of something to maintain as true opposed to...

  • Affirmed

    AFFIRM'ED, pp. Declared asserted averred confirmed ratified. ...

  • Afflict

    AFFLICT', L. affligo, afflicto, of ad and figo, to strike eng. flog Gr. to strike , L. plaga, a stroke. Hence, eng. flail, g being suppressed L. flagellum. See Flog. 1. To give to the body ...

  • Afflicted

    AFFLICT'ED, pp. Affected with continued or often repeated pain, either of body or mind suffering grief or distress, of any kind followed by at, by or with as, afflicted at the loss of a child, by ...

  • Affliction

    AFFLIC'TION, n. 1. The state of being afflicted a state of pain, distress, or grief. Some virtues are seen only in affliction. 2. The cause of continued pain of body or mind, as sickness, los...

  • Affording

    AFFO'RDING, ppr. Yielding producing selling without loss bearing expenses. ...

  • Affright

    AFFRI'GHT, affri'te. See Fright. To impress with sudden fear to frighten to terrify or alarm. It expresses a stronger impression than fear or apprehend, and perhaps less than terror. AFFRI'GH...

  • Affrighted

    AFFRI'GHTED, pp. Suddenly alarmed with fear terrified followed by at or with, more generally by at as, affrighted at the cry of fire. ...

  • Afoot

    AFOOT', adv. a or on and foot. 1. On foot borne by the feet opposed to riding. 2. In action in a state of being planned for execution as, a design is afoot, or on foot....

  • Afore

    AFO'RE, adv. or prep. a and fore. 1. In front. 2. Between one object and another, so as to intercept a direct view or intercourse as, to stand between a person and the light of a candle - a po...

  • Aforehand

    AFO'REHAND, adv. afore and hand. 1. In time previous by previous provision as, he is ready aforehand. She is come aforehand to anoint my body. Mark 14 . 2. a. Prepared previously provi...

  • Aforetime

    AFO'RETIME, adv. afore and time. In time past in a former time. ...

  • Afraid

    AFRA'ID, a. The participle of affray. Impressed with fear or apprehension fearful. This word expresses a less degree of fear than terrified or frightened. It is followed by of before the object ...

  • Afresh

    AFRESH', adv. a and fresh. Anew again recently after intermission. They crucify the son of God afresh. Hebrews 6 ....

  • After

    'AFTER, a. The comparative degree of aft. But is some Teutonic dialects it is written with g. 1. In marine language, more aft, or towards the stern of the ship as, the after sails after hatchwa...

  • Afterward

    'AFTERWARD, or 'AFTERWARDS, adv. See Ward. In later or subsequent time....

  • Afterwards

    'AFTERWARD, or 'AFTERWARDS, adv. See Ward. In later or subsequent time....

  • Again

    AGAIN, adv. agen'. L. con, whence contra 1. A second time once more. I will not again curse the ground. Genesis 8 . 2. It notes something further, or additional to one or more particular...

  • Against

    AGAINST, prep. agenst'. 1. In opposition noting enmity or disapprobation. His hand will be against every man. Genesis 16 . I am against your pillows. Ezekiel 8 . 2. In opposition, not...

  • Agate

    AGA'TE, adv. a and gate. On the way going. Obs. ...

  • Age

    AGE, n. L. aetas,or aevum. But these are undoubtedly contracted words. 1. The whole duration of a being, whether animal, vegetable, or other kind as, the usual age of man is seventy years the a...

  • Aged

    A'GED, a. 1. Old having lived long having lived almost the usual time allotted to that species of being applied to animals or plants as, an aged man, or an aged oak. 2. Having a certain age ...

  • Ago

    AGO', adv. or a. See Go. Past gone as a year ago. ...

  • Agone

    AGONE, pp. agawn , See ago and Gone. Ago past since. Nearly Obs....

  • Agony

    AG'ONY, n. Gr. a contest with bodily exertion a word used to denote the athletic games, in Greece whence anguish, solicitude from L. ago. Gr. to strive. See Act. 1. In strictness, pain so ext...

  • Agree

    AGREE', gratia. the primary sense is advancing, from the same root as L. gradior. 1. To be of one mind to harmonize in opinion. In the expediency of the law, all the parties agree. 2. To liv...

  • Agreed

    AGREE'D, pp. 1. Being in concord or harmony of opinion of one mind. Can two walk together except they be agreed? Amos 3 . 2. Assented to admitted as, a proposition is agreed to. 3. Se...

  • Agreement

    AGREE'MENT, n. 1. Concord harmony conformity. What agreement hath the temple of God with idols? 2 Corinthians 6 . 2. Union of opinions or sentiments as, a good agreement subsists among th...

  • Aground

    AGROUND', adv. Of a, at or on, and ground. 1. On the ground a marine term, signifying that the bottom of a ship rests on the ground, for want of sufficient depth of water. When the ground is nea...

  • Ague

    A'GUE, n. a'gu, 1. The cold fit which precedes a fever, or a paroxysm of fever in intermittents. It is accompanied with shivering. 2. Chilliness a chill, or state of shaking with cold, though...

  • Ah

    AH, An exclamation, expressive of surprise, pity, complaint, contempt, dislike, joy, exultation, &c., according to the manner of utterance. ...

  • Aha

    'AH'A. 1. An exclamation expressing triumph, contempt, or simple surprise; but the senses are distinguished by very different modes of utterance, and different modification of features. 2. A sun...

  • Aided

    A'IDED, pp. Assisted supported furnished with succor. ...

  • Aiming

    A'IMING, ppr. Pointing a weapon at an object directing any thing to an object intending purposing. ...

  • Air

    AIR, n. L. aer Heb. to shine. The radical sense is to open, expand whence clear or to flow, to shoot, to radiate. 1. The fluid which we breathe. Air is inodorous, invisible, insipid, colorles...

  • Alabaster

    AL'ABASTER, n. L. from Gr. A sub-variety of carbonate of lime, found in large masses, formed by the deposition of calcarious particles in caverns of limestone rocks. These concretions have a folia...

  • Alarm

    AL'ARM, n. 1. Any sound, outcry or information intended to give notice of approaching danger as, to sound an alarm. 2. A summon to arms. 3. Sudden surprise with fear or terror as, the fire ...

  • Alas

    ALAS', ex. An exclamation expressive of sorrow, grief, pity, concern, or apprehension of evil sometimes followed by day or while alas the day, like alack a day or alas the while, expressing an un...

  • Albeit

    ALBE'IT, This is supposed to be a compound of all, be and it, and is equivalent to admit, or grant it all. Be it so admit all that although notwithstanding. Whereas ye say, the Lord saith it, ...

  • Algum

    AL'GUM, n. In scripture, a tree or wood about which the learned are not agreed. The most probably conjecture is that the word denotes gummy or resinous wood in general. The Vulgate translates it l...

  • Alien

    A'LIEN, a. alyen, L. alienus, from alius, another. L. alieno, to alienate alter, another, to altercate. 1. Foreign not belonging to the same country, land or government. 2. Belonging to one...

  • Alienate

    A'LIENATE, L. alieno. 1. To transfer title, property or right to another as, to alienate lands, or sovereignty. 2. To estrange to withdraw, as the affections to make indifferent or averse, w...

  • Alike

    ALI'KE, a. Having resemblance or similitude similar. The darkness and the light are both alike to thee. Psalms 13 . This adjective never precedes the noun which it qualifies. ALI'KE, adv. ...

  • Alive

    ALI'VE, a. 1. Having life, in opposition to dead living being in a state in which the organs perform their functions, and the fluids move, whether in animals or vegetables as, the man or plant i...

  • All

    ALL, a. awl. Gr. Shemitic from calah, to be ended or completed to perfect. 1. Every one, or the whole number of particulars. 2. The whole quantity, extent, duration, amount, quality, or degree...

  • Allegory

    AL'LEGORY, n. Gr. other, to speak, a forum, an oration. A figurative sentence or discourse, in which the principal subject is described by another subject resembling it in its properties and circum...

  • Allied

    ALLI'ED, pp. Connected by marriage, treaty or similitude. See ally. ...

  • Allow

    ALLOW', L. loco, to lay, set, place. See Lay. 1. To grant, give or yield as, to allow a servant his liberty to allow a pension. 2. To admit as, to allow the truth of a proposition to allow...

  • Allowance

    ALLOW'ANCE, n. 1. The act of allowing or admitting. 2. Permission license approbation sanction usually slight approbation. 3. Admission assent to a fact or state of things a granting. ...

  • Allowed

    ALLOW'ED, pp. Granted permitted assented to admitted approved indulged appointed abated. ...

  • Allure

    ALLU'RE, To attempt to draw to to tempt by the offer of some good, real or apparent to invite by something flattering or acceptable as, rewards allure men to brave danger. Sometimes used in a ba...

  • Ally

    ALLY', L. ligo. 1. To unite, or form a relation, as between families by marriage, or between princes and states by treaty, league or confederacy. 2. To form a relation by similitude, resemblanc...

  • Almighty

    ALMI'GHTY, a. all and mighty. See Might. Possessing all power omnipotent being of unlimited might being of boundless sufficiency appropriately applied to the Supreme Being. ALMI'GHTY, n. Th...

  • Almond

    AL'MOND, n. 1. The fruit of the almond tree an ovate, compressed nut, perforated in the pores. It is either sweet or bitter. It is popularly pronounced ammond. 2. The tonsils, two glands near...

  • Almost

    ALMO'ST, adv. all and most. Nearly well nigh for the greatest part. Almost thou persuadest me to be a christian. Acts 26 ....

  • Alms

    'ALMS, 'amz. Eng. almesse L. eleemosyna Gr. to pity. Any thing given gratuitously to relieve the poor, as money, food, or clothing, otherwise called charity. A lame man was laid daily to ask an...

  • Aloes

    ALOES, in medicine, is the inspissated juice of the aloe. The juice is collected from the leaves, which are cut and put in a tub, and when a large quantity is procured, it is boiled to a suitable con...

  • Aloft

    ALOFT', adv. a and loft. See Loft and Luff. 1. On high in the air high above the ground as, the eagle soars aloft. 2. In seamen's language, in the top at the mast head or on the higher ya...

  • Alone

    ALO'NE, a. all and one. 1. Single solitary without the presence of another applied to a person or thing. It is not good that man should be alone. Genesis 2 . This adjective follows its n...